Free Sample: Equipotential Computer Lab paper example for writing essay

Equipotential Computer Lab - Essay Example

The circle at the top changes color to reflect the relative ignited and polarity of the potential at the point in the cross hairs. You will be using this tool to plot the potential lines. 2. Check the box in the green window labeled “Grid. ” Notice that the major lines of the grid are at intervals of 0. 5 meters. In the same window check the box labeled “Show E-Field. ” Once a charge is placed in the test area, you will see arrows that represent the electric field due to the charge. 3. Place one of the positive charges in the center of the test area.

Notice the electric field? Move the charge around a note what the field does. Answer the following: a. How does the program show the direction of the electric field at any point? The electric field points away from the positive charge. B. How does the program show the magnitude of the electric field at any point? The program shows the magnitude is greater where the arrows are darker. C. Where is the electric field strongest? The electric field is the strongest at the center where the electric charge is located. D.

In the diagram below, draw the electric field of a positive point charge: 4. Move the equipotent tool around the test area and note the color change of the circle. A. How is it related to the voltage measured in the field? The voltage increases when the exponential tool is moved closer to the center and the circle gets a darker red. B. Where is the voltage the highest? The voltage is the highest directly on top of the positive charge. Use the tool to plot equipotent lines at mm intervals from the charge.

Fill in the table below: Distance (m) Voltage (V) Open the free online graphing website (http://tools. Shabbiness. Com/graphed/) and create a graph using the data table above. Paste corrections of the graph here. Does the voltage due to a point charge vary directly or inversely with distance from he charge? The voltage varies directly with the distance from the charge. In the diagram from number three, draw in the equipotent lines around your charge. **(The graph was not large enough to plot all six exponential lines at the actual 1 meter increments)*** c. How is the electric field oriented relative to the equipotent lines? The electric field is oriented perpendicular to the exponential line. 5. Clear the test area. Place a negative charge in the test area. On the diagram below, draw in the electric field lines and equipotent lines for a negative charge: a. How are the field lines oriented relative to the equipotent lines? The field lines are perpendicular to the exponential lines. 6.

Clear the test area. Place two positive charges a distance of 1. 5 m apart in the test area. Use the diagram below to draw in the field and equipotent lines: 7. Repeat for two negative charges: 8. Repeat for a positive and a negative charge. This configuration is what is called a “dipole. ” 9. Repeat for a double line of oppositely polarize charges. This will take a little time to set up: 10. What does the electric field of the previous configuration resemble? It resembles a capacitor. 1 . For all the configurations, the following should be true statements.

Circle the boldfaced choice that will make each one true. The electric field points in the direction of increasing / decreasing voltage. A positive charge released in an electric field will spontaneously move with / against field lines. A positive charge released in an electric field will spontaneously move from regions of high / low potential to regions of high / low potential. A negative charge released in an electric field will spontaneously move with / against A negative charge released in an electric field will spontaneously move from regions